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More and more healthcare systems are adopting programs connecting patients to essential resources. However, little is known about when and how to scale and spread these programs within health systems, especially in a way that is integrated into standard primary care for all patients.

Launched in May 2018, CASHI brings together 22 primary care teams from across the country to discuss ways to improve and grow social needs pilot programs across their organizations.

Using quality improvement methods, this 18-month partnership aims to:

  • Identify effective diffusion strategies for improving primary care patients’ social support
  • Spread successful strategies to additional sites within systems
  • Create a business case to encourage investment in helping patients overcome social impediments to health

CASHI is made possible by generous funding from The Commonwealth Fund.

Participating Organizations

Public healthcare systems across California’s Bay Area share a vision of equitable communities where all residents have a path to achieve their optimal health–a vision they know is impossible without ensuring that everybody has access to the resources essential for a healthy life.

We’re proud to support these leading public health systems on their joint effort to build regional capacity to scale social needs programs. Launched in April 2018, this 16-month collaborative aims to:

  • Improve outcomes in existing social needs programs
  • Design and test new tools and models to connect people with essential needs
  • Develop systems to coordinate efforts and support health for all patients
  • Design a regional framework for coordination of care delivery and social services

BALI is made possible by generous funding from The Stupski Foundation.

Participating Organizations

Federally qualified health centers have known that essential resources are core to health long before “upstream” care became the widespread goal it is today. But despite their history of expanding the boundaries of care outside clinic walls, FQHCs face unique challenges to sustaining social needs programs.

In April 2016, Health Leads and The Boston Foundation partnered with four Boston-based health centers around a shared goal of increasing access to community resources as a standard part of quality care.

By using a common data collection system (Health Leads’ Reach™) and quality improvement methods, this three-year partnership aims to:

  • Quantify the impact of resource support
  • Promote testing and implementation of changes
  • Gather common metrics to help understand why different approaches to navigation are successful in different contexts

TBF is made possible by generous funding from The Boston Foundation.

Participating Organizations